Facts

Tips to Survive Deadly Wild Animal Attacks

Here's a list of pointers that might just save your life.

For most of us, the chance of encountering a wild animal attack is pretty slim but terrifying. While humans are undoubtedly the most dangerous species on earth, facing a 20 feet long shark or a roaring lion would leave most of us fearing for our life and at a good chance of losing it too. As life can be quite unpredictable, it doesn’t hurt having a couple of survival tips handy.

Sharks

via – sacbee.com

– If you ever face a shark, DO NOT splash around. Splashing around is going to excite and invite a shark’s            interest. While a shark’s diet does not normally include human beings, they tend to attack when curious or confused. If they see a human flailing around in the water they might try to investigate, which could lead to an accidental attack.

– Look it in the eye. Sharks tend to be very aware of a diver’s eyes. Often, they will only tend to attack if they have the advantage of surprise.

– If you find yourself in a position where you have to fight, hurt it where its sensitive; the gills. Do whatever you can: punch, poke, kick but be careful of where you aim, you do not want to end up anywhere near the mouth.

– Back away slowly. Without displacing much water, keeping the shark in sight very slowly try swimming backwards towards the shore.

Lions

via – channel.nationalgeographic.com

– If you ever manage to come face-to-face with a lion, DO NOT run. A lion is much faster than you and you won’t stand a chance to outrun it. The moment you turn your back to them you look like prey and instinct takes over. Stand still. Also, don’t climb a tree because they can do that better than us too.

– As you stand still, it is important to figure out what the predator wants. If a lion is swishing its tail back and forth, it is feeling threatened. But If a lion is hunting, it will stay as still as possible. If it is in fact hunting, well, bad luck.

– If the lion isn’t approaching but not leaving either, try slowly backing away to your place of safety such as your vehicle, all the while facing the lion.

– Lions tend to do mock charges initially before attacking if it does, make yourself look bigger by throwing out your arms and make as much noise as possible. This may make them run off.

 Leopards

via – awf.org

– In case you face a Leopard, unlike in the case of a lion encounter, DO NOT make eye contact, they may view it as a challenge.

– Leopards do not tend to make mock charges. As you would do when facing a lion, make yourself look bigger and make a lot of noise.

Chimpanzees

via – psmag.com

– Stay cool, don’t show fear. A chimpanzee is less likely to attack if it believes it can’t win the fight.

– Protect your face. This is the first thing they go after if they attack. If you are attacked try to curl up into a ball and make it hard for them to reach other target areas such as hands, ears and the nose.

– It depends on the chimp’s intention. If it attacks you and it continues for a length of time, assuming it wants to kill you, play dead.

Venomous Snakes

via – list25.com

– If you encounter a snake, back away slowly.

– If it is following you, drive it away by stamping on the ground to make vibrations.

– If you are very near to a snake, about a meter away, freeze. It is most likely to look for an escape route.

– Even if it appears to be dead, no not pick up or poke a snake. Some snakes play dead and may strike if disturbed.

– If you do get bitten, keep the affected body part lower than the level of your heart to slow down the spread of the venom through the bloodstream. Try and remember or if possible, take a picture of the snake to make it easier for the doctors to figure out which anti-venom you require.

Read Also – DB Cooper: A man never found, and a case never solved

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Kavita Mishra

Just another management student exploring the different crazy areas of life one adventure at a time. Books, TV shows, writing, music, animals and coffee are my way of surviving our chaotic existence.

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